If something gets printed enough times without being challenged, it becomes fact.

TV and radio used to fill their broadcasts with newspaper headlines, today they just repeat what they hear on blogs. Even blogs broadcast what they hear on other blogs.

Blogs now drive our media cycle.

'Trading up the chain' is when you spawn a story in a number of local blogs before informing mid-size blogs about the news.

If you link to numerous smaller publications, mid-size blogs will repeat the news. If enough mid-size blogs start to write about a story then it will catch the attention of larger blogs and the story will start to gain its own momentum.

You can encourage this process by driving paid traffic to smaller blogs and then informing the mid-size blogs about the abnormal traffic spikes related to the story.

You could also report the story as a number of disconnected anonymous tipsters.

The bottom line is that bloggers are easy to exploit because they don’t make much money.

Critics call blogging “digital sweatshops" for a good reason. They are expected to churn out an incredible amount of content because they get paid in relation to the amount of traffic they generate.

Bribing a blogger with free products, gifts, and advertising deals works but dangling a controversial story in front of them is better because it doesn’t leave a paper trail.

If you want to sell a blogger on a story, it is critical that you tell them exactly what they want to hear.

Nobody has the time, or motivation, to vet media sources anymore.

You just have to make sure you give them something that will spread and make sure that they understand why it will spread.

This involves distorting the news, pandering to extremes and leaving out any important information that might make the story less appealing.

Notes from a book called Trust Me I’m Lying by Ryan Holiday.